Thursday, February 23, 2017
   
Text Size

Nature comes to life on park safari

00-chinadaily

Saturday, 12th March 2016

By Ben Lerwill ( China Daily )

Nature comes to life on park safari

The Galle Clock Tower. [Photo by Ben Lerwill/China Daily]

Spoiler alertI didn't see any leopardsThereI've said itI'd come on safari to Yalathe SriLankan national park renowned for having the world's highest concentration of leopardsbutdespite spending upward of 10 hours rumbling through the park's forests and grasslands in ajeepI didn't see a single spotted big catNot a tailNot a whiskerYou'd think at least one ofthe creatures might have sensed a nice photo opportunity and padded into a clearing for afew secondsNoLeopards are many thingsI learnedbut they're not marketing-savvy.

Here's another spoiler thoughI was far less bothered than I thought I would beYala islocated on Sri Lanka's south coastand it says much about the region that when you're here,details like a lack of obliging leopards seem fairly trivialThe coastline is lined with surfbeachespalm trees and sun-splashed villagesIts main settlementGalleis a bona fideUNESCO-listed wonderAnd Yala itself is nothing if not a busy placethe park teems with allsorts of other exotic inhabitantsfrom elephantssloth bears and peacocks to jackals,crocodiles and sea eagles.

If you find yourself grumbling in Sri Lankain other wordsyou need to ask yourself somefairly serious questionsMy southern explorations began in Gallethe colorful coastal citysettled by the Portuguese in 1589 and subsequently ruled by both the Dutch and the Britishbefore Sri Lanka regained its independence in 1948. The city gives rich insight into severalcenturies worth of historyIts best-known feature is its sturdily handsome colonial fortwhichthese days encloses an entire town's worth of streetshotelsshophouses and restaurants.

"You should try to take a walk around the ramparts right about now," advised Yatawaramyjovial driver for the weekwhen we arrived in Galle just before sunset. "It's the best time ofday for it." I took his adviceflinging my bag into my hotel room and heading out into the warmevening air.

Yatawara knew what he was talking aboutThe high walls of the fort form a loop of aroundthree kilometersand almost the entire length was astir with peoplelocalstouristscouples,snake-charmers and selfie-snappersThree sides of the fort look out onto the Indian Ocean(the fourthincidentallygives a fantastic view of Galle's famous cricket stadiumand thesunset panoramasglowing crimson and orange in the dying lightwere spectacular.

Nature comes to life on park safari

Yala. [Photo by Ben Lerwill/China Daily]

Lively scene

Galle Fort may be firmly rooted in the pastbut the place was very much aliveTuk-tuksputtered along the streetlocal children smacked footballs at each otherexpats sipped oncocktails outside old-world hotelsI found a rooftop restaurant serving up classic vegetariancurries and wallowed in the luxury of having nothing to do but relax and eatThe food in SriLanka is often sensationalbenefiting from the various culinary influences imported byeveryone from the Arabs and Malays to the Indians and PortugueseCoconut milkgarlic,chilies and fish all figure prominently.

Just as Sri Lankan cuisine is diverseso too is Sri Lankan religionTheravada Buddhism isthe most prominent faithwith HinduismChristianity and Islam all figuring significantly too.And days lateras Yatawara and I moved gradually east towards Yalathe country's variedsightssmells and sounds made themselves feltorange-robed monks stood outsideroadside templesfishermen perched on wooden stilts offshore in search of a few rupees,families wandered through beach settlements of surf shacks and laid-back restaurants.

Things haven't always been so relaxedof courseSri Lanka has borne witness to some torridevents in recent decadesNot only was it sucked into a long and brutal civil wara conflictwhich finally halted in 2009, it was also one of the countries worst hit by the devastatingBoxing Day tsunami of 2004. The south coast was particularly tragically affectedalthough theanimal inhabitants of Yalawhich sits adjacent to the ocean shorelinemanaged a near-miraculous collective escape.

"It seems as though they sensed the tsunami before it arrived," explained Saratha safariguide at the national park. "The waters came inland for more than a kilometerbut when theyreceded we found just a tiny number of animal carcassesThey had all headed away from thecoast before it hit."

Nature comes to life on park safari

Tourists taking pictures in a jeep in Yala. [Photo by Ben Lerwill/China Daily]

Close to nature

Yala is a special placeCovering an area of almost one thousand square kilometersthe parkis the most visited nature reserve in the countryIts landscapes include dense junglelowwetland and open vistas of rocky outcropsI was staying at Chena Hutsa new upmarketretreat situated in the buffer zone on the park outskirtsI had an inkling my stay would bememorable when I opened my curtains on the first morning and saw a peacock strollingaround my plunge poolHalf an hour latera wild boar wandered past while I was havingbreakfastIt was that kind of place.

The main appeal of being hereof coursewas the chance to take two daily game drives.Each time we entered the parkdifferent wildlife mini-dramas unfoldedThere's a tendency inYala for jeeps to cluster in the areas where leopards are most likely to appearalthoughfrankly it rather takes the gloss off a safari when you're bumper to bumper with 15 othervehiclesAt Sarath's recommendation our jeep instead made an effort to steer clear of thecrowds.

It was a fine decisionOne afternoon we found a secluded waterhole and looked on as storksstepped past crocodiles and buffalo lazed under ironwood treesOn another we came acrossan entire family of elephantsthe youngest of them vigorously tearing branches and foliagefrom the bushThe next morning we watched a crested hawk-eagle devouring a fat monitorlizardthen rounded the corner to see two competing peacocks strutting around a lonepeahentail-feathers raised with boastful importanceEach drive produced something new.

Nature comes to life on park safari

Peacock in Yalathe Sri Lankan national park. [Photo by Ben Lerwill/China Daily]

Game viewing

Leopards will always be Yala's poster-boys butas previously establishedin my case theyremained elusiveFor methe creatures that will stick in the mind are instead the park'selephantsI spotted at least two on every game driveand they always made for an imposingsightSmaller than their African cousinsthey nevertheless loomed like gray giants in theforestimpossibly solid and impossibly powerfuland impossibly hungryfor that matter.

The animal itself occupies a special place in Sri Lankan cultureWhen an especiallyrenowned elephant passed away in 1998-a male known as Maligawa Tusker Rajathegovernment declared an official day of national mourningThe country clearly recognizes thevalue of its wildlife in tourism terms tooalthough it would be heartening to see some sort ofregulation in place to prevent Yala's main game-viewing area becoming too swamped withjeeps in years to come.

Sri Lanka is a hugely rewarding travel destinationThe pace of lifeon the wholeis heavilyconducive to relaxationand the island's multi-layered blend of different creeds and cultureshelps to create a visitor-friendly environmentIf you're looking for a fine introduction to theplaceyou could do far worse than combining Galle and YalaAnd if you see a leopard ortwoConsider it a bonus.

Nature comes to life on park safari

Galle's old town wall. [Photo by Ben Lerwill/China Daily]

Six other places not to miss in Sri Lanka

KandySri Lanka's second city sits "upcountry", surrounded by hills in the center of theisland and providing a vivid counterpoint to the sand-fringed resorts of the coastIt's home toa number of absorbing sightsnot least the Temple of the Tooththe most significant Buddhistshrine on the entire islandThe city's main landmark is Kiri Muhudathe lake at its centerandit's possible to take short pleasure cruises onto the waterBut perhaps Kandy's greatest gift isits role as a gateway to the dramatic scenery and tea plantations of the so-called "hillcountry", the most archetypal of all Sri Lankan landscapes.

Wilpattu National ParkSet in the northwest of the islandthis is the largest of Sri Lanka'snational parksBefore the civil war made the region dangerousit was also its most visited.Today its charm lies in the fact that it draws relatively few visitorswhile also offering excellentopportunities to spot leopards and sloth bearsThe birdlifeas elsewhere in Sri Lankaisworld-class tooThe park takes its name from the picturesque willusnatural depressionsfilled with rainwaterfound across its landIt's also a good spot for seeing elephantsandthere's even accommodation within the park.

ColomboThe national capital is a busy citywith around 3 million people calling it homeIt'snot an immediately lovable placebut as Sri Lanka's only functioning international airport sitson its outskirtsthe city gets incorporated into many itinerariesIts most obvious attractions forvisitors are the buzzing bazaar quarter referred to as The Pettahmost of the goods on saleare practical items rather than souvenirsbut it still makes for a highly atmospheric areaandthe historical district known as Fortwhere you'll find a good selection of museums andcolonial buildings.

Nature comes to life on park safari

Fishermen standing on stilts in Galle's outskirts. [Photo by Ben Lerwill/China Daily]

KataragamaIf you're looking to get an insight into just how deep religion runs in Sri Lanka,this is the place to comeThe small southern town is considered a profoundly importantspiritual site not just by Buddhists but by Hindus and Muslims tooand is best experienced inthe eveningwhen the main puja (show of reverencetakes placeMost of the action centerson the area known as The Sacred Precinctwhere musiciansdancers and pilgrims combineto create a heady scene of devotionIt's worth staying the night if you want to enjoy the pujawithout having to rush off.

Jaffna and the far northThe vagaries of the civil war were felt fiercely in the far northwhichis still home to the majority of Sri Lanka's Tamil populationThese days the area can bevisited fairly easilyand holds rich rewards for those in search of a cultural contrast to the restof the islandThe largest town is Jaffnawhich sits on a peninsula at the uppermost tip of thecountry and has a thick Indian influenceThanks to improvements in the rail networkit's nowpossible to travel here by train direct from Colombo.

UnawatunaHugely popular with independent travellersUnawatuna sits on the south coastclose to Galle and has made its name as somewhere to surf and unwindyou'll findeverything from snorkelling and yoga to diving and nightclubbing on offerIts postcard-friendlygood looks are helped by a scattering of green rocky outcrops offshoreand there's a vastselection of different places to eat and drinkranging from rice-and-curry houses and seafoodrestaurants to Italian bistrosThe resort sits just 5 kilometers from Galle itself.

Nature comes to life on park safari

Sloth bear. [Photo by Ben Lerwill/China Daily]


Nature comes to life on park safari

Buffalo. [Photo by Ben Lerwill/China Daily]

Nature comes to life on park safari

Elephant. [Photo by Ben Lerwill/China Daily]

From : http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/weekend/2016-03/12/content_23836086.htm 


missionnews

indday2017

newsfromom2

Online Consular Services

att01

att02

att03

   fb  twitter-logo  youtubesunclouds
     irb
    zimbra_mail  ftp

Important Links

            HEweb
pmweb1
news gov.info
travel tourism
business financial
defence immigration

announcements

Gov20151GICnewslk2015SLTPB

AASL

cbsl-2013BOI2015

Consular Assistance

Publication-new

UNHRC AND HUMAN RIGHTS

UNHRC20151

national-action-plan-HR

ONUR

scrm

Manifesto


maithri-en-manifesto
S-Button20-1-2015    T-Button20-1-2015

Sri Lanka Missions Overseas

Downloads

natanthemsin

natanthemtam

na2

na3

musical-score

Lakshman Kadirgamar Institute

lkiirss_logob1  b2

b3


BIDTI

BIDTI_logo

NEWS FROM OTHER GOVERNMENT INSTITUTIONS